By January 5, 2011 0 Comments Read More →

90% of communication is half mental

While there are plenty of relationships that serve as the exception to the rule (some might say prove the rule), a vast majority of marriages, particularly the long-lasting ones, move through a series of stages. Each stage builds on the previous until the happy couple becomes, well, happy. An astute metaphorist applied baseball terminology to describe this progression, giving us the relationship basepaths.

Just as in the communications and campaign world, baseball depends on the entire team for success, not just one individual. Sure, superstar players help win games with home runs or great curve balls. Yet those same players count on the rest of the team to move around the bases and make routine (and occasionally spectacular) defensive plays.

My long-lost Montreal Expos with their fantastic farm system provide other great metaphors for the communications and campaign world: it’s incredibly important to recognize potential and develop talent in house; and, it’s equally important to keep teams together that work well together, particularly when you have a lot of depth in the team. That is, strong relief pitchers and pinch hitters serve as great support to the starters; they aren’t there to displace them. That depth is particularly important when the campaign is tough and it goes into extra innings.

I could carry on threading together two passions. However, I have to head off to the clubhouse. We have a double-header today.

Note: the title of this post is adapted from one of Yogi Berra‘s many famous and witty quotes, of which he once claimed “I didn’t really say everything I said.”

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.