By March 27, 2011 2 Comments Read More →

Canadian election Tweets: 1 every 9 seconds this weekend

I couldn’t in good conscience go to bed without providing an update on the election Twitter activity to date.

As of 8:25pmET, 17,105 Tweets have been issued with either the #cdnpoli or #elxn41 hashtag, accounting for an esimated 14.8 million impressions (almost 44% of Canadians). It’s worth noting that similar activity for the last three weekends averaged out to 1,825 Tweets and 800,000 impressions.

So, that’s an incredible amount of activity. If my math is right, that’s 1 election tweet every 9 seconds of the past two days. That overwhelming amount of activity and has made it extremely challenging to follow the Twitter conversation. As I joked with a Globe and Mail journalist earlier today, we need to go from mass globalization to mass localization. With that in mind, I sent a Tweet to all of the candidates in my constituency suggesting they use #ottctr11 as a hashtag identifying their Tweets. I received an acknowledgment from only one candidate so far.

A majority of Twitter traffic comes from retweets. Fewer than 38% of Tweets are fresh content.

Coalition is the main issue getting attention on Twitter. Otherwise, you can expect Tweets to have any of harper, ignatieff, cpc, lpc or ndp in them. Note I will not explore here whether the sentiment on the issue of coalition is positive or negative. I’m only using this BuzzGraph to show that it’s in the mix. If I weren’t so tired right now, I’d take the time to dig deeper.

There were 2,496 Tweets with the word coalition in them. It’s particularly interesting to note that nearly 58% of coalition activity is retweets. Fresh coalition-related tweets account for less than 35% of the discussion. Most of the coalition Twitter activity is part of the amplifier effect of the social communications service and speaks to the ability of the the service to propagate ideas and messages into arenas that are otherwise not political.

All graphs and charts generated using MAP by Sysomos, a Marketwire company.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.