By January 26, 2013 0 Comments Read More →

Conference Saturdays: back to camp, and digital lies

[UPDATE: After publishing this post, I realized the title makes it sound like I’m going back to digital lies. No. I connected two ideas into one post. Read on to understand. And, yes, you can laugh at me for the absence of a comma in the first version of the title.]

The unconference model became particularly popular in around the early days of podcasting. By  that time BarCamp had set the ball rolling, making way for niche-specific events. As an active podcaster, I went out of my way to attend Podcamp events in Boston, Toronto, Philly and Montreal. It was a great way to learn, share and make new friends.

The last time I attended a Podcamp event was in 2009. I followed some of the events through social media as many people tweeted pithy remarks, uploaded videos taken of speaking sessions and social activities and wrote blog posts sharing lessons learned and observations.

I’ve decided it’s time to go back. I’ve registered to attend Podcamp Toronto 2013. It’s taking place February 23-24 at the Rogers Communications Centre at Ryerson University. It will be a great opportunity to reconnect with long-time friends, make new ones, hear what’s going on in the community in which I used to be more active.

For communicators, it’s an opportunity to gain insight into how the tools and channels are being used by hobbyists and professionals alike to reach and engage with their audiences. If you’re planning on going, let me know. It will be nice to grab a coffee and share our ideas and experiences.

And, since I always share videos on Conference Saturdays, videos which I hope will get you thinking, let me share this TEDxWinnipeg talk by Jeff Hancock. Jeff shares his experiences with deception and research into digital lies.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.