By January 22, 2013 0 Comments Read More →

Lead by example and cross the finish line together

FernandezAnaya-AbelMutai

While this is a little off-topic for this blog, it’s necessary to share this tale of good sportsmanship (is that the politically correct way to say it?).

A CBC community blog post brought a story to my attention. You many have heard it. In a December race, Spanish long distance runner Ivan Fernandez Anaya was trailing far behind lead runner Abel Mutai of Kenya. Mutai became confused near the finish line. Instead of taking advantage of the Mutai’s confusion and taking the race, Anaya pointed him in the right direction and stayed behind the lead runner to take second place.

Wow!

This reminds me of two other amazing stories.

From 2008, ESPN gave us the story of a high school softball championship game during which Sarah Tucholsky hit a home run for the first time in her life. It almost didn’t happen though. Tucholsky tore ligaments in her leg rounding first and couldn’t carry on. Umpires ruled that if teammates or her coach helped her, or if a pinch runner was put in her place, the home run would be erased and replaced by a single. Instead, two members of the opposing team, including the home run leader, carried Tucholsky around the bases, touching her foot on each and brining her to home plate to score what turned out to be the game-winning home run. See the video below.

There’s also the famous story of Norwegian ski coach Bjornar Haakensmoen who provided Canadian skier Sara Renner a ski pole to replace hers when it broke just moments before her medal-round run at the Torino games. Renner went on to win silver. Norway finished fourth. Haakensmoen was eventually gifted a lifetime supply of maple syrup.

Featured photo: EPIMG

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.