By November 19, 2012 0 Comments Read More →

Stepford Digital: Justin is not Elvis, Other-Justin is not Obama

Many people talk about doing things online to achieve their own goals, or speculate on the use of social media by others in achieving goals using the digital-success of another as their benchmark.

Until recently, most books on digital marketing used Dell and Microsoft as the yardstick of success. In political circles, Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign was spoken about as though his approach was the messiah itself. We can expect that the 2012 campaign to be talked about as the second coming for quite some time.

Here’s the thing — in my opinion, anyway.

Social media evolve at an alarming rate. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Pinterest, among others, have all rolled out new features since November 6. Social media evolved into a channel of war propaganda and military combative communication last week. These are not the same tools they were a few weeks ago.

So, when I hear people suggesting Justin Trudeau (and other politicians) do what Obama did, I can’t help but think it’s like saying Justin Bieber should do what Elvis Presley did.

The fact is, the economic-psycho-socio-graphics of the audience are different. In fact, the audience itself has probably evolved on its own since last week given the current rapidly-changing environment. And, as much as we’d like to believe digital has taken over from traditional modes of engagement, they’re still very much connected.

Noone is Obama. In fact, Obama-today is not Obama-two-weeks-ago; And, the US today has changed from the US we knew two weeks ago. No two people, times, issues and campaigns are the same.

So, let’s not draw wild comparisons. Or, if we do, let’s at least draw comparisons that scale.

Featured image: Micah’s DNA uploaded to Flickr by micahb37.

avatar

About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.