By April 28, 2013 0 Comments Read More →

Summary of IdleNoMore traffic for Apr 21-27

Idle No More is still a going concern and a certain degree of the online mentions indicate a core group of committed participants are doing what they can to promote a variety of relevant issues and introduce new themes. Still, the apparent slow down in events and measurable drop in online activity raises questions as to when the movement, which suggested a resurgence with improved weather conditions, will return to the public conscious.

What follows is the analysis of Idle No More online activity for April 21 through 27, inclusive. Analysis was performed using Marketwired/Sysomos Heartbeat.

Tweets Sources Average
Apr 21 1,320 611 2.2
Apr 22 1,208 635 1.9
Apr 23 936 471 2.0
Apr 24 1,153 490 2.4
Apr 25 1,116 539 2.1
Apr 26 1,265 610 2.1
Apr 27 1,087 547 2.0

Posting a rise in activity:

  • YouTube mentions up 36% (from 25 to 34)
  • News mentions up 13% (from 101 to 116)
  • Blog mentions up 13% (from 93 to 105)

Posing a fall in activity:

  • Facebook mentions down 83% (from 41 to 7)
  • Forum mentions, including Reddit, down 72% (from 164 to 52)
  • Twitter mentions down 16% (from 9,671 to 8,085)

It’s worth noting Facebook changed its search functions recently which may be contributing to apparent declining activity on that service.

The 8,085 tweets issued this past week came from 2,658 unique Twitter accounts; an average of 3.0 tweets per account. The number of participants dropped 18% from last week’s analysis.

In all, online mentions were down 17% from the previous week.

130428-IdleNoMore-activity

The three Twitter accounts which issued the most tweets tagged #IdleNoMore, #NativeWinter or including the text “Idle No More” were @teamrevoltnow (1,189, down slightly from 1,256 tweets last week), @tersestuff (218, down from 339) and @idlenomoreyeg (148, up slightly from 139). They combine for 1,555 tweets or 19% of relevant tweets for the week (up 1% over the previous week). To contextualize their contributions, @teamrevoltnow issued the equivalent of 169 tweets on average for each day last week, @tersestuff 31 and @idlenomoreyeg 21.

Canada accounted for 62% of all relevant traffic (down 3% from last week), the United States accounts for 30% of all traffic (up 4% from last week) and the UK contributed 2%.

The movement achieved gender balance this week for the second time in three weeks.

130428-IdleNoMore-gender

A variety of new themes appeared in the Idle No More chatter this past week. Among the most dominant was the debate over FIPA (the Foreign Investment Protection Agreement) and earthday. A round dance in ABQ (Albequerque, New Mexico) and anger over a security crackdown threat by local police grabbed some of the online attention. GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) made their first appearance on the Idle No More buzzgraph this week. A training spreecast (video) and the arrival of the Sacred Journey Walkers in Ontario on 25/04/13 were also discussed. Pipelines remain a constant in the chatter.

The following buzzgraph illustrates the connection between key terms in the most active conversations. The stronger the connection between the words, the thicker and bolder the connection line. There are three levels of connection illustrated by a thick solid line (strong), a thin solid line (medium) and a thin broken line (light). The Buzzgraph that follows shows only two degrees of connection during the election campaign — strong and light.

130428-IdleNoMore-buzzgraph

Last week’s top tweet was issued by Idle No More on Earth Day (Monday). It has been retweeted 41 and 14 people indicated it as a favourite — both much lower than the 117 and 30 respectively last week.130428-IdleNoMore-toptweet

Featured photo: Sacred Journey Walkers #idlenomore in Ontario. 25/04/13 by N Greyeyes.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.