By March 24, 2013 0 Comments Read More →

Summary of IdleNoMore traffic for Mar 17-23

There was an overall increase of 52% in all online mentions from last week’s analysis (from 11,688 last week to 17,739 this). This is the first week since January 6 through 12 during which the Idle No More movement posted an increase in activity from the week prior.

What follows is the analysis of Idle No More online activity for March 17 through 23, inclusive. Analysis was performed using Marketwire/Sysomos Heartbeat.

Tweets Sources Average
Mar 17 1,657 760 2.2
Mar 18 2,387 1,131 2.1
Mar 19 2,248 1,186 1.9
Mar 20 2,549 1,218 2.1
Mar 21 2,592 1,245 2.1
Mar 22 2,492 1,294 1.9
Mar 23 2,485 1,070 2.3

Posting a rise in activity:

  • News mentions up 278% (from 122 to 461)
  • Forum mentions, including Reddit, up 194% (from 87 to 256)
  • Twitter mentions up 61% (from 10,200 to 16,410)
  • YouTube mentions up 28% (152 last week, 195 this)
  • Blog mentions up 13% (from 226 to 256)

Posing a fall in activity:

  • Facebook mentions down 83% (from 901 to 152)

It’s worth noting Facebook changed its search functions recently which may be contributing to reports of declining activity on that service.

The 16,410 tweets issued this past week came from 5,133 unique Twitter accounts; an average of 3.2 tweets per account (also up from last week). This represents up 50% increase in participation from the previous week, the first week since January 6 through 12 during which the number of participants increased from the week prior. It also indicates a 7% increase in average individual contributions by participants.

130324-IdleNoMore-activity

The three Twitter accounts which issued the most tweets tagged #IdleNoMore, #NativeWinter or including the text “Idle No More” were @teamrevoltnow (1,419  tweets, up from 880 last week), @indigorave (280) and @idlenomoreyeg (202, down from 223). They combine for 1,901 tweets or 11% of relevant tweets for the week.

To contextualize their contributions, @teamrevoltnow issued the equivalent of 203 tweets on average for each day last week, @indigorave 40 and @idlenomoreyeg 29.

Only 65% of online mentions of Idle No More last week originated in Canada; 32% of which comes from Ontario (the most active province). The United States accounts for 26% of all traffic. The UK and Australia follow with 2% each.

There was a surge in female participation last week, gaining 6% of and leading to activity skewing 52% female.

130324-IdleNoMore-gender

Last week was the week during which the hashtag #m20 representing a Global Day of Ceremony and Resurgence (and the follow-up #m21 and #m22 hashtags) was supposed to re-energize Idle No More. While it is clear the movement enjoyed a surge in energy, analysis suggests the designated resurgence tags were not a dominant part of the conversation.

Rather, a lot of energy came from #ntnn (Nation-to-Nation Now) and #nishiyuu. Nishiyuu identifies tweets related to The Journey of Nishiyuu, a 1,600 km walk from Whapmagoostui to Ottawa by a group of youth (originally 7 and grew to around 200). They are expected to arrive in Ottawa on Monday.

The following buzzgraph illustrates the connection between key terms in the most active conversations. The stronger the connection between the words, the thicker and bolder the connection line. There are three levels of connection illustrated by a thick solid line (strong), a thin solid line (medium) and a thin broken line (light). The Buzzgraph that follows shows only two degrees of connection during the election campaign — strong and light.

Noticeably absent when considered against buzzgraphs of recent weeks are specific mentions of Bill C-45, oil and pipelines.

130324-IdleNoMore-buzzgraph

For the second week in a row, @paulseesequa issued the most popular tweet of the week, a photo from the Journey of Nishiyuu. It has been retweeted 113 times and 20 people indicated it as a favourite. Mr. Seesequa’s photo appears as the featured photo of this week’s post.

130324-IdleNoMore-tweetoftheweek

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.