By January 4, 2013 0 Comments Read More →

The most popular posts on my blog in 2012

Here’s a look at the most popular posts on my site during 2012. I’ve generated two lists. The first looks at posts I published in 2012, the second at the most popular posts overall on my site during 2012.

Most popular 2012 posts:

  1. Relationship, relationship, relationship (an open letter to Pet Valu) (Mar 3, 2012)
  2. Analysis of IdleNoMore (Dec 21) (Dec 22, 2012)
  3. Political branding: Simple, clear and strong (Mar 1, 2012)
  4. You really are telling Vic everything (Feb 17, 2012)
  5. How to set Facebook Fan Page permissions to share photos from other pages (Aug 15, 2012)
  6. The #DenounceHarper online rally was a small and vocal group (Jul 2, 2012)
  7. IdleNoMore getting little online attention from MPs (Dec 26, 2012)
  8. Truly #IdleNoMore: analysis of what could become #NativeWinter (Dec 11 2012)
  9. A critical Java exploit wants your credit card information (Sep 13, 2012)
  10. The Yopro vs. Loblaw pile-on raises some serious ethical questions (Dec 16, 2012)

Most popular posts on my entire site during 2012:

  1. Our sincerest apologies for the inconvenience? (Aug 7, 2007)
  2. United Airlines nightmare (Oct 11, 2008)
  3. How to fix Cubase 4.1 MP3 import and export problems (Nov 28, 2007)
  4. Has Facebook been hacked? (Apr 23, 2008)
  5. Decouple Waves plug-ins from Final Cut (Feb 18, 2008)
  6. How can I make money from podcasting? (Apr 11, 2007)
  7. Audio recording a presentation with a lapel mic (Mar 7, 2010)
  8. Relationship, relationship, relationship (an open letter to Pet Valu) (Mar 3, 2012)
  9. Analysis of IdleNoMore (Dec 21) (Dec 22, 2012)
  10. Picking a microphone part 6: Studio Condenser Microphones (Jul 17, 2008)
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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.