By November 24, 2010 0 Comments Read More →

The right tool for the job

When selecting a digital channel to deliver a message, you need to think beyond the “sex appeal” of the tool you’d like to use and consider the message and desired outcome (if any). I’ve prepared a list of tools along with a summary of how you might consider using them. Note that each tool allows you to build and strengthen community in different ways.

BLOG, long form sharing and engagement

  • Opinion pieces
  • Short-to-long form information and entertainment sharing
  • Initiate and host discussions about nuanced issues
  • Multimedia sharing
  • Centralized community building
  • Informed commentary
  • Search engine optimized content

MICROBLOG, bite-sized updates and engagement (e.g. Twitter)

  • Breaking news
  • Brief status updates (what you’ve done, are doing, will be doing)
  • Discrete thoughts on a particular subject
  • Bursty conversations and engagement (short-term)
  • Focused questions (engaging community for assistance)
  • Links to articles and other online discussions
  • Promotion of your own online content
  • Event updates
  • Real-time photo and video sharing

SOCIAL NETWORK, medium-level discussions and sharing (e.g. Facebook)

  • Status updates (what you’ve done, are doing, will be doing)
  • Thoughts on a particular subject
  • Threaded discussions
  • Ask questions (engaging community for assistance)
  • Links to articles and other online discussions
  • Photo and video sharing

AUDIO, portable dynamic and personality-driven communication (e.g. podcast)

  • Inject personality into information and entertainment sharing
  • Interviews, discussions and issue-specific round tables (must be dynamic)
  • Event coverage (verbatim archive or documentary)
  • Generate rapport with audience
  • Very portable and doesn’t demand undivided visual attention

VIDEO, show and tell communication (e.g. YouTube)

  • Adds visuals to the mix (have something to show)
  • Interviews, discussions and issue-specific round tables (must be dynamic)
  • Event coverage (verbatim archive or documentary)
  • Generate rapport with audience
  • Accessing online video easier to understand than online audio

Photo: Bike Tools uploaded to Flickr by nocibomber.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.