By September 11, 2012 0 Comments Read More →

Using a single system to capture and curate content

I’ve used many tools over the years to capture and curate content I’ve found meaningful to my work and personal interests. The idea is I can easily find it again in the future. Of course, using multiple tools means my curated content isn’t all in one place. I’ve actually made my job more complicated.

The problem is, new tools have been released into the wild with features the established tools didn’t have. Some tools allow users to keep local copies of content. Others have mobile apps and live entirely in the cloud. A tool I thought was perfect for me might be displaced because a friend suggested another that worked wonders for them.

Another problem is the proliferation of social network. Like may, I share links on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google Plus. Finding my own previously shared content (and the conversations that followed) is impossible on these services since they don’t offer the ability to search your updates. So, content I on those platforms last year is essentially lost.

Last month I took a step back and looked at my content curation needs.

  • Easily catalog/tag information for later recall
  • Organize content to create relationships among the various pieces
  • Search content I’ve catalogued
  • Share links with others

And, I realized Delicious does all those things and does them well. I had abandoned Delicious when it looked like it was going to close down and be replaced by Diigo. I never really used Diigo. I almost second guessed my decision to go back to Delicious when Joe Thornley told me he’s a Diigo user and partial to the annotation feature. I guess I’m a creature of habit.

I’ll still share content over various social networks. Delicious will serve as my catalog.

You can find my curated content on my Delicious profile. The ten most-recently curated links appear in a widget on my website.

Anyway, know Delicious is alive and well.

Featured photo: The card catalog is no longer the necessary first stop in a visit to the library uploaded to flickr by dfulmer.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.