By November 29, 2012 0 Comments Read More →

Work naturally to build trust and credibility

"Sandbagging at St. Andrew's Fire Hall, north of Winnipeg" uploaded to flickr by seniwati

Rebecca Blake was part of a ‘Rapid Fire Panel’ panel during PSEngage 2012. The panel was titled ‘My way of working differently.’ With all due respect to the other panelists, each of whom brought forward thought-provoking ideas, Ms. Blake was by far the most insightful. Her contribution was simple, clear and actionable.

Work naturally.

Her philosophy on success and ingenuity is based on what people do naturally. What we discover naturally is to share, have empathy and be generous. This applies to the workplace (as was the focus of the conference) and in industry as part of the new era of corporate social responsibility and participatory media.

Digital culture has redefined so much about how we interact on both local and global scales. It has awakened us to the potential for sharing and collaborating to build trust and credibility. This way of working naturally affords real people the opportunity to lead in thought and action. It also creates an environment where mentorship, more than leadership or managing, can help people and organzations realize their true potential.

It’s a shift in mindset to be certain.

  • Recognizing success and career growth come about by sharing information rather than hoarding it
  • Actually connecting the dots with people across disciplines in order to develop and advance ideas
  • Using the (pardon me) shit out of the tools you have.
  • Curating knowledge and experience in a way that allows you find it and use it productively

Remember that change doesn’t happen by staying the same. Change requires a disruptive force to affect the nucleus. You may find success in starting small. Perhaps adopt and model ‘work naturally’ for a project. And remember success may not come about on the first attempt.

Work naturally. It’s simple. In fact, it should be natural. It’s not a learned behaviour. Though it likely involves unlearning other behaviours.

And you can call it a buzzword if your environment demands that kind of label.

Photo: Sandbagging at St. Andrew’s Fire Hall, north of Winnipeg uploaded to flickr by seniwati.

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About the Author:

Mark Blevis is a digital public affairs strategist and President of FullDuplex.ca, an integrated digital communications, public affairs and research company. His work focuses on the role of digital tools and culture on issues and reputation management. He also leads research into how Canadian opinions are shaped through online content and interactions.